The Ordinary Heroes of the Taj

July 7, 2013

One of the world’s top hotels, the Taj Mumbai is ranked number 20 by Condé Nast Traveler in the overseas business hotel category. The hotel is known for the highest levels of quality, its ability to go many extra miles to delight customers, and its staff of highly trained employees, some of whom have worked there for decades. It is a well-oiled machine, where every employee knows his or her job, has encyclopedic knowledge about regular guests, and is comfortable taking orders.

Even so, the Taj Mumbai’s employees gave customer service a whole new meaning during the terrorist strike. What created that extreme customer-centric culture of employee after employee staying back to rescue guests when they could have saved themselves? What can other organizations do to emulate that level of service, both in times of crisis and in periods of normalcy? Can companies scale up and perpetuate extreme customer centricity?”

The preceding quote is from the latest “DFS Learning e-Blast” article, The Ordinary Heroes of the Taj by Rohit Deshpande and Anjali Raina.

In this December 2011 article in Harvard Business Review magazine, the authors tell the amazing and true stories of the terrifying events of November 26, 2008 and the remarkable reaction of the Taj employees and managers.  They explore the culture of the Taj and explain how we can think about strengthening our own customer centricity to help our teams be ready for any customer need – large and small.  It is all about the power of staff attitude in a service organization.

More from the article:

“We believe that the unusual hiring, training, and incentive systems of the Taj Group—which operates 108 hotels in 12 countries—have combined to create an organizational culture in which employees are willing to do almost anything for guests. This extraordinary customer centricity helped, in a moment of crisis, to turn its employees into a band of ordinary heroes. To be sure, no single factor can explain the employees’ valor. Designing an organization for extreme customer centricity requires several dimensions, the most critical of which we describe in this article.”

Read the short article to learn more!

Mike Osorio, your Dare to be Contagious™ strategist

www.OsorioGroup.com

What do you think?  Please add your comments to join the discussion!

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It’s Not What You Sell, It’s What You Believe

July 1, 2013

If there is one principle that explains why some organizations — Apple, Southwest Airlines, USAA, Cirque du Soleil, the Marine Corps, Pixar — consistently and dramatically outperform their rivals, it is that every person in the organization, regardless of job title or function, understands what makes the organization tick and why what the organization does matters.

The preceding quote is from the latest “DFS Learning e-Blast” article, It’s Not What You Sell, It’s What You Believe, by Bill Taylor.

In this April 4, 2012 article on the HBR Blog Network , the author provides a quick look at the difference between understanding what it takes to be successful, and truly believing.  Christina, who shared this article with me, had this to say:  We are getting our organizational to feel.  Sustainable culture isn’t when we can get everyone to say the right words of our vision or mission statement; it’s when we can get them to BELIEVE it.”

More from the article:

“What do you promise that nobody else in your industry can promise?  What do you deliver that nobody else can deliver?  What do you believe that only you believe?

The organizations that can answer those questions crisply, clearly, and compellingly are the ones that win big and create the most value.”

Read the short article to learn more!

Mike Osorio, your Dare to be Contagious™ strategist

www.OsorioGroup.com

What do you think?  Please add your comments to join the discussion!

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4 Keys of Successful Project Leadership

February 10, 2013

Leaders play a critical role in setting the conditions for a team to successfully manage a project.  If you focus on the following four key roles you can play on a project as the project leader you’ll dramatically improve the odds of project success.  More important, you’ll create a culture where your team members trust you and know you’re doing everything you can to help them succeed.”

 

The preceding quote is from the latest “DFS Learning e-Blast” article, 4 Keys of Successful Project Leadership, by Mike Figliuolo.

 

In this January 16, 2012 article from the thoughtLEADERS blog, the author discusses the difference between project management, and project leadership.

 

As a DFS leader, you are managing various projects for which you are responsible for delivering excellent results.  The four key roles detailed in the article, if played well, will make all the difference in the success of your project.

 

More from the article:

 

In creating the right culture, you’ll boost morale, reduce turnover, improve productivity, and generally have a team that wins more often.”

 

Read the short article to learn more!

 

Mike Osorio, your Dare to be Contagious™ strategist

www.OsorioGroup.com

What do you think?  Please add your comments to join the discussion!

Thank you for visiting my blog. Please follow, subscribe using RSS, and/or comment on my postings.