Three Rules of Three for Successful Communications

December 30, 2012

Three Rules of Three for Successful Communications

November 10, 2011

DISCUSSION TOPIC

Three Rules of Three for Successful Communication – 11-10-2011

All:

For as many words as we use, we’re terrible communicators. Voicemails are jumbled streams of consciousness. Emails are “text bombs” with no rhyme or reason. Presentations are nothing but crippling piles of slides. But don’t worry – here are three rules of three to make your communications clearer, more compelling, and more efficient/effective.”

 

The preceding quote is from the latest “DFS Learning e-Blast” article, Three Rules of Three for Successful Communications, by Mike Figliuolo.

 

In this article from leadership consultant Mike Figliuolo’s thoughtLEADERS blog, the author provides three quick ideas for significantly improving the effectiveness of your communications.  In this time of communication overload, anything to help you make yours better is worthwhile.

 

Read the short article to learn more!

 

Mike Osorio, your Dare to be Contagious! ™ strategist

www.OsorioGroup.com

What do you think?  Please add your comments and add to the discussion!

Thank you for visiting my blog!  Please subscribe using the RSS button and comment on my postings.


October 17, 2009


Visitor Map
Create your own visitor map!


Baldwin park – Stereotyped?

June 5, 2008

DISCUSSION TOPIC: Latino Leaders Say ‘No’ to Amigo Stores

TOPIC SUMMARY:

Retail developers in the Los Angeles area are learning a valuable lesson from people like Manual Lozano, mayor of Baldwin Park. The lesson is that while it’s important to target your offering to your audience, it is even more important to actually know what they want before you pitch a new project.

Recently, Mr. Lozano and other officials from Baldwin Park listened to developers make a pitch on a new project in the community. Having studied the demographics of the area, the developers proposed a shopping center with a “Latino feel,” according to a Los Angeles Times report.

The mayor, a second-generation Mexican American, was not happy being presented with a project based on what he believes is a typecast of Baldwin Park and its citizens.

“We want what Middle America has as well,” he told the LA Times. “We like to go to nice places like Claim Jumpers, Chili’s and Applebee’s… We don’t want the fly-by-night business, the ‘amigo store,’ which they use to attract Latinos like myself.”

Some in Baldwin Park believe that the Council, made up entirely of Mexican-Americans, is ashamed of its roots.

“I was born in Mexico and raised in this country. I agree we need some change. But what they want to bring here is totally unrealistic. Applebee is good, but a Kabuki? And also a Trader Joe’s? Come on, I don’t even go to Trader Joe’s,” said Rosalva Alvarez, the owner of a beauty shop located in the area being considered for development.

Anthony Bejarano, a graduate of Georgetown University law school, is among Mr. Lozano’s allies on the Council. A fourth-generation Mexican American who speaks “very little Spanish,” he told the LA Times, “I love to go to traditional Mexican restaurants. I shop at Vallarta [supermarket], but I can’t get everything I need. At the end of the day, it’s all Mexican restaurants here. When we want Italian, when we want sushi, where do we go? If I want a pair of Kenneth Coles, I have to go to Arcadia.”

Discussion questions:  What lessons are there for developers, retailers and consumer brand marketers in the Baldwin Park experience? How quickly is acculturation taking place within Latino communities and how do marketers successfully navigate the differences in evidence in Baldwin Park?

My post:  I find it amazing that developers and retailers continue to misread the wants and desires of ethnic communities.  Just a little bit of local research and customer panel groups can provide the basics of a neighborhood’s retail desires.  Add a bit of demographic analysis and you can start formulating options.  Ultimately, retailers and developers that avoid this research in the name of cost savings pay a larger price in the end when the business fails.  The carpenter’s rule holds true:  measure twice, cut once…

Mike Osorio, your Dare to be Contagious! TM strategist

www.OsorioGroup.com

————————————————-
Go to the full discussion at RetailWire.com:
http://www.retailwire.com/Discussions/Sngl_Discussion.cfm/13008    

————————————————-

Thank you for visiting my blog!  Please subscribe using the RSS button and comment on my postings.  Comments are the life-blood of any blog and I appreciate yours!


Keeping it Green, Keeping it Real

May 25, 2008

DISCUSSION TOPIC

Consumers Buy Green. Do They Understand It? 

TOPIC SUMMARY:

Green products are in high demand these days as many consumers seek, in ways big and small, to use their purchasing power to make the world a cleaner and healthier place to live.

According to a study by Mintel, the number of green products rolled out in 2007 was more than double the launches of similar items in 2005. Mintel is looking for 2008 to produce roughly 1,000 additional green items over last year’s total of 5,933.

Mintel found that 36 percent of adults claim to regularly buy green products, triple the number from 16 months ago. At the same time, the numbers of Americans who never buy green products went from 20 percent to 10 percent.

Lynn Dornblaser, director of CPG trend insight at Mintel, said consumers’ desire for green products and their lack of knowledge left them vulnerable to fraud. She told Brandweek about a paper towel that promoted itself as “100 percent cellulose.” All paper towels are 100 percent cellulose, she said and then added, “That’s like an orange juice saying ‘100% orange juice.'”

Discussion questions:  Is consumers’ apparent lack of understanding of terms such as sustainability an impediment to sales or does this lack of understanding actually enable marketers to more effectively move products branded as green? Do you see consumers becoming more savvy about green issues and conversely greenwashing activities or are they largely waiting on some other party (the media, government agency, etc.) to alert them when a marketer’s claims do not pass the smell test?

My post:  The green movement has hit its stride and become quite mainstream.  There is a danger that it may become passé and our youth may move on to the next trend.  However, I believe the trend is so powerful that corporations and governments will continue to drive universal acceptance of sustainability because of both social and profit based motivations.  It is important to keep the teens and young adults engaged since they drive most innovation.  Culling fraudulent products is important to ensure their engagement continues.

Mike Osorio, your Dare to be Contagious! TM strategist

www.OsorioGroup.com

————————————————-
Go to the full discussion at RetailWire.com:
http://www.retailwire.com/Discussions/Sngl_Discussion.cfm/12976   

————————————————-

Thank you for visiting my blog!  Please subscribe using the RSS button and comment on my postings.  Comments are the life-blood of any blog and I appreciate yours!


Dress like Lindsay Lohan (or your pick)

May 1, 2008

DISCUSSION TOPIC:  Shopping Online to Look Like a Celebrity

TOPIC SUMMARY:

Online fashion retailer asos.com has built its business on one simple principle: helping consumers dress like celebrities. The idea, as The Guardian explained, is to have models parading down the catwalk wearing outfits similar to those seen on the famous so that the not-famous can choose a style they would like to emulate at a fraction of the cost.

The site actually links fashion looks to faces. Customers can click on their favorite celebrity/pop star and view clothes that look a bit like things they have been pictured in. Victoria Beckham, Lindsay Lohan and Jennifer Lopez have proved to be particular favorites. Another unique feature is the ability for consumers to then see the item on models parading down the catwalk.

The site now carries 250 brands including big names such as Balenciaga and YSL. Targeting women aged 18 to 34, Asos claims some 1.7 million registered users, according to The Guardian, with 180,000 potential customers browsing each day and 200,000 orders at an average £60 each month. Menswear makes up 15 percent of sales, beauty and cosmetics three percent. Each of the 8,300 items is photographed and stock turned (replaced) every nine weeks.

Discussion questions:  What do you think of asos.com’s use of celebrity connections and catwalks to sell fashion apparel? Is Asos taking celebrity connections to online fashion retailing to a new level? Should department stores and fashion boutiques pursue similar techniques to capitalize more on celebrity and designer connections?

My post:

I just spent some time on this fantastic British site.  I can clearly see why it is so successful.  The ability not only to see clothes that a preferred celebrity either wears or might wear, but also to see it modeled on a catwalk with music is very cool.  The brands shown are good quality and the sections with premium brands and independent designers take it to another level.  There are site navigation issues, but overall it is a great experience and one which clearly resonates.  A version to be seen in the US soon?  I think it could work with a retailer already thought of as cool, but maybe even Macy’s or Penney’s should give it a try.

Mike Osorio, your Dare to be Contagious! TM strategist

www.OsorioGroup.com

————————————————-
Go to the full discussion at RetailWire.com:
http://www.retailwire.com/Discussions/Sngl_Discussion.cfm/12931    

————————————————-

Thank you for visiting my blog!  Please subscribe using the RSS button and comment on my postings.  Comments are the life-blood of any blog and I appreciate yours!